Unitary taxation, Barclays and Africa

I just read the Tax Justice Network briefing which is explained in Richard Murphy’s blog title “Barclays and HSBC make the case for unitary tax in the UK – because we’d have collected £2.6 billion more in 4 years.” Now I haven’t checked out the UK figures at all, but the inclusion of Barclays piqued my interest, because by some measures it has a bigger operation in Africa than it does in the UK.

Unitary taxation makes me nervous, because while the idea is to draw the tax base away from tax havens and towards economic substance, I worry that under most formulae – certainly those acceptable to the G20 – it may also suck the tax base away from developing countries.

The segmental analysis in Barclay’s accounts means that it’s possible to conduct a hypothetical case study to help answer this: would Africa be better or worse off under a simple unitary tax formula as compared to the current system?

I’ve quickly cobbled together a spreadsheet to do that for the last three years. I reproduced the TJN figures to make sure it’s comparable. I couldn’t find a tax figure for Africa, but that’s fine, the best comparison is anyway the tax base, that is, the pre-tax profits. So I applied the same two-factor formula as the TJN report proposes, which divides up the group profits on the basis of staff numbers and turnover. TJN wanted to use fixed assets as a third factor well, but couldn’t find any data. I’ve had a go at it, by using the number of distribution points (branches and sales centres), although this doesn’t change the overall distribution very much.

The result is interesting. When the group as a whole is profitable, Africa does better from this simple unitary approach than it does from the status quo. But because the African operations are not subject to the same shocks as other parts of the business have been, in 2012 Africa is much more profitable than the group overall, and so it does a lot worse under the unitary approach that takes the overall group profits as its starting point. The net effect of the unitary approach over three years is still positive, though: the African tax base is £2.9bn-£3.3bn as compared to £2.0bn under the status quo.

Link to Google spreadsheet

There are of course caveats. The staffing and profit figures I used are for the Africa segment, which doesn’t quite include all the African operations (though the turnover figure does). According to the ActionAid tax haven tracker, Barclays has six subsidiaries in the tax haven of Mauritius, which might distort the Africa figures.

Most importantly, though, Barclays is a big service provider in Africa. It has a lot of sales, a lot of staff, and a lot of branches in Africa. So it’s not a typical case study. I don’t think Africa would do so well out of unitary taxation of a company that was primarily extracting minerals or growing agricultural commodities for export.